Awakened rectitude? | Tom Camfield

Tom Camfield
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Posted 6/16/22

“THE WORLD IS WATCHING what we do here.”

As usual of late, I have no proper illustration for the following without abusing The Associated Press, which is not designed for non-profit …

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Awakened rectitude? | Tom Camfield

Posted

“THE WORLD IS WATCHING what we do here.”

As usual of late, I have no proper illustration for the following without abusing The Associated Press, which is not designed for non-profit use. But what is provided here above should be adequate to introduce a Free Press of long standing, the cause of justice — and the self-serving stupidity of the general public. The Rev. Damon’s entire address will be found as an appendix to my first book of local history in 2000.

Now, 131 years later than the cornerstone dedication, Republican U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming told members of her own party: “There will come a day when President Trump is gone. But your dishonor will remain.” She later stated that “The sacred obligation to defend this peaceful transfer of power has been honored by every American president — except one.”

Cheney spoke June 9 as vice chairwoman of the House Select Committee to Investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The committee began laying out, over television, in shocking and meticulous detail, the extent of former president Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the election and keep himself in office.

As we follow the egocentric efforts of Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, Governor Ron DeSantis of Florida, etc., it is the party’s dishonor and dishonesty at the highest level that was called to account by Cheney and others in the televised presentations of detail that was to be continued Monday of this week.

So far collected by the committee is, among other things, information that Trump endorsed the hanging of his own vice-president Mike Pence.

Vague responses such as “fake news,” and Fox News in general, still don’t cut the mustard in response.

As Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss and chairman of the Select Committee, said, “Donald Trump was at the center of this controversy . . . ultimately, Donald Trump, President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy . . . Our Democracy remains in danger . . . Jan. 6 and the lies that led to insurrection have put two and a half centuries of constitutional democracy at risk. The world is watching what we do here.”

I’ve voted for a variety of presidents since turning 21 back in 1950, but none of them have been Republicans for quite some time. Probably my favorite GOP member of all time was Governor/Senator Dan Evans — still with us as far as I know, although he’s several years older (now 96) than I. I didn’t like the take-over activities of Vice President Dick Cheney under George W. Bush — but I really like his daughter Liz. Hopefully, she will help manage to take the GOP back in the proper direction.

Meanwhile, I am continually amazed at the resemblance of some of the comments of John Damon in 1891 to the remarks all these years later by Liz Cheney and other members of the Select Committee. The presentations of the Committee should be readily available on line, including Monday disclosures I will not have time to deal with here.

Damon said in 1891: “The judicial history of this past period has been impressive of all forms of impersonation, from feeble vacillation to sturdy firmness; from sterling personal integrity selected by a sense of patriotism to a criminal shielded from the just consequences of deliberate and premeditated assassination, to wear the sullied ermine for political ends. How it behooves the present generation to care for its rights! Ever remembering that its judiciary is, in ll that makes it valuable and important in the economy of government, the highest and best expression of the individual verdicts of the citizen at the polls.

“If then, the halls of justice and equity are but the offices of those who can more or less in direction secure their own elevation at the hands of politicians, how important that the people keep the reins in their own hands that they may not be made merchandise of, or verdicts be obtained by the highest bidder, without regard in the merit in the controversy. As no private injury may be inflicted without a public detriment, that man who knowingly permits neighbors to suffer without raising his voice in protest, is untrue to the best interests of society, and becomes, passively at least, party to the wrong which his fearless and timely exposure could have prevented.”

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  • Justin Hale

    Rectitude is not a word I use very often, so I had to look it up. It speaks to "morally correct behavior or thinking; righteousness"..... Ok.

    Tom says "So far collected by the committee is, among other things, information that Trump endorsed the hanging of his own vice-president Mike Pence." Can Tom cite a source that substantiates this claim other than second-hand hearsay? I doubt it, so much for rectitude.

    "Donald Trump, President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy"..... Again, can you cite anywhere where Trump urged the gathering at the Capitol to violence? I doubt it, so much for rectitude.

    Thursday, June 16 Report this

  • MargeS

    I think I will wait until the Jan. 6th committee has presented all it's evidence. So far, they have pretty much followed what I saw with my own eyes on January 6, 2021. Never been a Cheney fan, but at least she didn't fall for Trump's lies. So many, Just-in-hale, but I will list them with sources if you insist. Never cared for Pence either but at least he knew not to perform something that was illegal.

    “I heard this week that President Trump said I had the right to overturn the election. President Trump is wrong. I had no right to overturn the election,” Pence, 62, said.

    “The presidency belongs to the American people and the American people alone. And frankly, there is no idea more un-American than the notion that any one person could choose the American president. Under the Constitution, I had no right to change the outcome of our election.”

    After Pence said that he did not believe he had the authority to reject Electoral College votes, Trump tweeted that "Mike Pence didn't have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution, giving States a chance to certify a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones which they were asked to previously certify. USA demands the truth!" CNN May 26, 2022

    "We came up with the idea to occupy just outside the CAPITOL on Jan 6th," leaders of the Stop the Steal movement wrote on Dec. 23. They called their demonstration the "Wild Protest," a name taken from a tweet by Trump that encouraged his supporters to take their grievances to the streets of Washington. "Will be wild," the president tweeted. Orlando Weekly.

    Give it up, Trump is guilty of so many things from raising money after telling supporters the election was stolen to encouraging his followers:

    "The first was that thousands of people had come to Washington because President Donald Trump had encouraged them to be there that day both by repeatedly — and falsely — claiming that the 2020 presidential election had been stolen and by explicitly telling his supporters to be in Washington on that particular date." Washington Post, Feb 10, 2021

    Thursday, June 16 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    “I heard this week that President Trump said I had the right to overturn the election. President Trump is wrong. I had no right to overturn the election,”

    Pence is right, and he fulfilled his duties as VP.

    Regardless of Trump tweeting his opinion of what Pence did, Trump never ordered him to do anything illegal or unconstitutional. Last I checked even the POTUS is entitled to his opinion.

    Trump "encouraged his supporters to take their grievances to the streets of Washington. "Will be wild," the president tweeted." In his speech that day he said they were going to the Capitol to peaceably demonstrate and let their voices be heard. Show me anywhere he urged violence. Last time I checked we have a right to assemble.

    Trump is no more responsible for the riot at the Capitol than the leaders of the Black Lives Matter are for the demonstrations/riots and deaths that occurred during those events, or the Democrat-led city council of Seattle is responsible for the riots that occurred and the deaths at the CHAZ.

    The Jan.6 committee is nothing more than the Democrat's campaign strategy for the mid-term elections. They will make a lot of noise and bluster, waste a lot of taxpayer dollars picking and sniffing out any morsel of data that they will toss into a word salad bowl, and cobble together some kind of charge just like they did in the phony Russia Collusion fable.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    When it comes to principled courage with their lives on the line, my hat's off to Mike Pence, members of his family and the U.S. Secret Service.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • MargeS

    Surprise! Just - in - hale doesn't belief anyone who has testified in the Jan 6th hearings. Even though a lot of them were there, and are Republicans.

    “Donald Trump and his allies and supporters are a clear and present danger to American democracy,” Luttig said at the close of the hearing. “They would attempt to overturn that 2024 election in the same way that they attempted to overturn the 2020 election, but succeed in 2024 where they failed in 2020. I don't speak those words lightly. I would have never spoken those words ever in my life, except that that's what the former president and his allies are telling us.”

    Luttig, a former judge on the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals who was appointed by former President George H. W. Bush, became prominently connected to Jan. 6 when Pence cited his legal reasoning in a letter that day detailing why he would not reverse the outcome of the election.

    Who is Judge J. Michael Luttig:

    “More recently, as the former U.S. Court of Appeals Judge J. Michael Luttig observed, ‘[t]he only responsibility and power of the vice president under the Constitution is to faithfully count the Electoral College votes as they have been cast,’ adding ‘the Constitution does not empower the vice president to alter in any way the votes that have been cast, either by rejecting certain votes or otherwise,’” Pence wrote in the letter.

    Before being in Pence’s orbit, Luttig had a long career as a conservative lawyer.

    Former President Donald Trump in a statement Sunday said he wanted then-Vice President Mike Pence to overturn the 2020 presidential election, repeating the false claim that Pence had the power to do so and slamming recent bipartisan efforts to reform the Electoral Count Act CNN

    No one should take Just in hale serious. Trump will be prosecuted for trying to overturn an election.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    "Just - in - hale doesn't belief anyone who has testified in the Jan 6th hearings."

    Do I believe Luttig when he says “Donald Trump and his allies and supporters are a clear and present danger to American democracy"? No, I don't.

    "Trump will be prosecuted for trying to overturn an election."..... Can you cite a specific charge? "trying to overturn an election" is pretty ***ue.

    Hate on, Haters!

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • MargeS

    You are a traitor just like Donald Trump.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    ***.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • MargeS

    So who is Just in hale? Google him, nothing.

    Friday, June 17 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Marge

    Typical hater response, when you can't make a case to support your arguments you turn to attacking those who don't agree with your nonsense.

    Saturday, June 18 Report this

  • MargeS

    No, it's just there is no point.

    Saturday, June 18 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    Sorry, Donald. I'm afraid you will not find anyone able to re-write the U.S. Constitution to suit your personal benefit.

    Monday, June 20 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    You made your point, the same one you've been spewing for the last 6 years, which is you have a pathological hatred for the duly elected 45 POTUS, who you believe should be in jail without citing any laws he has been convicted of, and you consider those who differ with your opinion lesser Americans. In other words your a good representative for the Democrat party.

    -------------------------------------

    Tom, "Sorry, Donald. I'm afraid you will not find anyone able to re-write the U.S. Constitution to suit your personal benefit." ..... You mean like you advocated in your previous blog?

    "I don’t remember ever professing to be a “strict gun control advocate,” although I’ve always been in favor of upgrading the Second Amendment."

    Monday, June 20 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    Some of my favorite goals seem to have considerably more Democrat than Republican involved in them these days. They would include such things as feeding people who are hungry and giving people a decent place to sleep—especially when children are involved. I’m also hot on early education, climate change remedies and some form of birth control. And I don’t mind paying a few extra taxes here and there. Etc. Donald Trump, meanwhile, symbolizes everything I oppose.

    Wednesday, June 22 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Two centuries ago, a somewhat obscure Scotsman named Tytler made this profound observation: "A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury.....

    " The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson

    You say you are for "feeding people who are hungry and giving people a decent place to sleep—especially when children are involved" ..... That's a fine and noble sentiment, almost biblical. If you choose to do that good for you, but forcing others to is a different thing.

    Wednesday, June 22 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    I somehow can't go along with a grab-what-you-can society . . . in which everyone seeks to have it better than others around him/her. (And what's with the crazy legislators in Missouri?)

    Friday, June 24 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    I have found that in life there are Givers and Takers, I prefer the former. Missouri?

    Saturday, June 25 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    I guess it all is determined by how big one's human family is considered to be. I, for instance, do not consider all recipients to be mere "takers." As for Missouri, I haven't had time to check—but I'm told that now the law provides that if you conceive a child there, then seek reproduction prevention in another state, you can wind up in court. So watch it during motel stops when passing through that state.

    Sunday, June 26 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    My "human family" is firstly my immediate Family and those I and my wife created, then my extended Family, then those who I choose to take on a measure of responsibility for, as I did for a young Polish man and a Vietnamese Family after the Vietnam war.

    I also do not consider all recipients of Social welfare as mere takers.

    But I certainly consider those who enter our country illegally and then go on the welfare dole as takers, the same for families that are generational welfare recipients, these are the takers I feel no obligation to support with my tax dollars.

    If the law in Missouri, is as you state it, then it's a stupid law and the citizens of Missouri should reject it, if they don't then that's their choice, that's what Democracy is about isn't it?

    Sunday, June 26 Report this