Man sentenced to six months in jail for attacking his mother

Posted 1/13/22

 

An Idaho man accused of stomping on his mother and breaking her ribs and bones in her face last October in Brinnon has admitted his guilt in the assault.

Nicholas Arthur Ball, 29, …

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Man sentenced to six months in jail for attacking his mother

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An Idaho man accused of stomping on his mother and breaking her ribs and bones in her face last October in Brinnon has admitted his guilt in the assault.

Nicholas Arthur Ball, 29, reached a plea agreement with prosecutors Friday.

He entered a pleading of guilty to second-degree assault and  was sentenced to six months in jail, which was the middle of the standard sentencing range of three to nine months for the crime.

Superior Court Judge Keith Harper also sentenced Ball to 12 months of community custody following his jail term, and ordered him to pay $700 in court costs.

Lillian Powers, Ball’s attorney, noted that Ball had started treatment for his substance abuse problem.

Ball apologized for the assault before he was sentenced.

“I’m embarrassed and ashamed of what I have done to my mother. And I hope someday I can make amends to her,” he said.

Ball was arrested Nov. 17 after deputies were called to a domestic assault in Brinnon.

Ball, who had called 911, said his mother had started to hit him and he had to hold her back, eventually pushing her to the ground to get her to stop.

A deputy who was in Quilcene started to go to the home, and Ball told authorities a second time no one was hurt and an aid unit wasn’t needed.

Ball’s mother was described as being passed out on the floor, and a sergeant told the deputy in Quilcene to go out and check on her condition.

When the deputy arrived, he spoke to Ball and his girlfriend, who were on the front porch of the home, but could see through the open door that Ball’s mother was lying on the living room floor.

She was unresponsive at first, and the deputy could see that one of her eyes was nearly swollen shut. Her lips and cheeks were swollen and red, and the deputy also noticed a large amount of blood in her mouth.

When the woman first began to respond, according to a probable cause report, she immediately tried to cover her face, expecting to be hit.

Aid units were called, and Ball was put in the deputy’s patrol car. He came back to find Ball’s mother was again unconscious. After she was revived, she said Ball was “violent when he drinks” and said he had knocked her to the ground and then started stomping on her face and body.

Ball told the deputy that his mother had been drinking heavily and had attacked him, though Ball had no visible injuries and he said he was not injured in any way, according to court documents.

When asked why he didn’t just leave instead of engaging with his mother, he again claimed that she had been drinking and that he called 911 first.

Ball’s girlfriend struggled to give details of what had happened, but said Ball’s mother had hit him before he took her to the ground.

Her story then changed multiple times. She later told a sergeant from the sheriff’s office that an argument had ensued, then escalated to the point where Ball punched his mother in the face, knocking her to the floor, and then Ball began kicking and stomping on his mother’s face and body as she was lying there.

A deputy said it also appeared she had been hit in the face with a beer can.

The girlfriend also said Ball had a history of domestic violence and believed that he was on probation out of Idaho.

Ball’s mother was taken to the hospital, where she was found to have fractures in her face and broken ribs.

Ball was charged with a felony count of second-degree assault with added factors of substantial bodily harm, egregious lack of remorse, and domestic violence.

He was arraigned on the assault charge in October in Jefferson County Superior Court, and entered a pleading of not guilty.

During that court appearance, his trial had been set for Jan. 31.

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